allusion / illusion

allusion / illusion
   An allusion is a subtle reference or hint: Rita Book made an allusion to the most recent novel she read in our conversation yesterday.
   An illusion is a deception, mirage, or a wild idea: The teacher said she had no illusions about how much work teaching demands.

Confused words. 2014.

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  • allusion / illusion —    An allusion is a subtle reference or hint: Rita Book made an allusion to the most recent novel she read in our conversation yesterday.    An illusion is a deception, mirage, or a wild idea: The teacher said she had no illusions about how much… …   Confused words

  • allusion — illusion …   American English homophones

  • illusion — allusion …   American English homophones

  • allusion, delusion, elusion, illusion — These words, somewhat alike in sound and spelling, have different meanings and uses. An allusion is an indirect reference or mention: He made an allusion to a character in a TV melodrama. Delusion means a false belief, one usually held as a… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • allusion — allude, allusion 1. To allude to someone or something is to mention them ‘indirectly or covertly’, i.e. without mentioning their name, unlike refer, which means to mention them directly, i.e. by name. So if you refer to Julius Caesar you name him …   Modern English usage

  • illusion — See allusion. See allusion, delusion, elusion, illusion …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • illusion — [14] The notion of ‘play’ is at the etymological heart of illusion (as indeed of its close relatives allusion [16], delusion [15], and elude [16]). It came via Old French from Latin illūsiō, a derivative of illūdere ‘make fun of’. This was a… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • illusion — [14] The notion of ‘play’ is at the etymological heart of illusion (as indeed of its close relatives allusion [16], delusion [15], and elude [16]). It came via Old French from Latin illūsiō, a derivative of illūdere ‘make fun of’. This was a… …   Word origins

  • allusion — See allusion, delusion, elusion, illusion …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • allusion — n. (often foll. by to) a reference, esp. a covert, passing, or indirect one. Usage: Often confused with illusion. Etymology: F allusion or LL allusio (as ALLUDE) …   Useful english dictionary

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